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Thursday, June 25, 2015

Find My Past Library Edition!

I have numerous friends who are librarians.  To be honest, they are among some of the best people to have as friends.  I mean really!  They know how to find stuff quickly and are always up for a good research trip.  Plus, libraries!  You can't go wrong visiting a library.

That is why I was so excited to find this little gem in my mailbox this morning from Find My Past.  I hope you will be just as excited as I was about this news.   It looks like it is a great opportunity for libraries and researchers to get to know this website even better.


Salt Lake City – June 25, 2015

Findmypast, a global leader in family history, announced today the official release of their product for libraries and organizations in the United States. The Findmypast Library Edition gives library access to billions of records from Findmypast’s wide array of collections from the United States, Ireland, England, Wales, Scotland, and other areas of the world. Collection highlights include:
  • ·         Largest online collection of parish records from the United Kingdom
  • ·         Exclusive access to the new PERiodical Source Index (now with images)
  • ·         Most comprehensive Irish family history records in the world

Amongst the billions of records now available to library patrons is the new PERiodical Source Index (PERSI). PERSI, a popular tool used by genealogists, includes more than 2.5 million indexed entries from thousands of genealogical and local history publications. For the first time, images of articles have been included in the collection – with more being added on a regular basis.

“We are delighted to bring the best resource for British and Irish family history to America’s library market,” said Annelies van den Belt, CEO of Findmypast.

The Library Edition provides tools for patrons to work in tandem with a library’s subscription and at home. Individual user accounts allow patrons to build their own family tree, save records from the library’s subscription, and continue working on their family tree.  Library patrons will also have access to Findmypast’s Hints, which aids in the discovery of records from their own family tree.


Librarians can contact them for further information, pricing, and to start a free 90-day free trial of the product.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Discovery! is almost as good as Eureka!

For the last year I have been playing around once a month with the MyHeritage website.  I would do more, but OMG this year has been so hectic and way to fast pace. Really, it’s June already?!

Moving on.  One of the features I am growing to love more and more is the instant discovery icon.  While I am not brave enough to merge people straight into my tree from another member’s tree it is a great way to get hints on other lines.  The hints I have found have really been worthwhile, and helped to fill in details I didn’t have.

Oh, and yes, you read that right I don’t (anymore) merge people’s trees into mine.  No matter how good the tree looks I am leery, and cautious. One too many bad apples upset the apple cart you could say.  That, however, is another post.

But back to MyHeritage. 

This discovery feature can be accessed two ways: from your family tree or the main page under discoveries.  Simply click the “Discovery!” icon and it will take you to a series of pages to confirm this is your ancestor.  From there you can choose to add those people into your tree.






The new people are actually marked “new” so if you disagree with anyone added from the merge you can go delete them.  That is my one complaint, I wish there was a way to only add the people you want to from those discoveries into your tree.  From what I read and saw there is no way to do that.  It is all or nothing. 

Lucky for me, I have a more complete tree (remember from earlier posts, I am adding people as I find through the record matches only on this site) on my desktop.  From my home tree I can compare the data before I merge it, but you may not have that ability.  It’s a neat feature, so I encourage you to explore it.  You may love it!  I know I have found it interesting so I encourage you to go and explore a little!



Monday, June 8, 2015

Blankies, Free Time, Whiskey and Find My Past

Image courtesy of iosphere a
FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Now that I got your attention, it’s been one of those weeks around here.  Many of you know that I have an ongoing illness and last week was a bad.  Most days found me curled on the couch with my pillow, fuzzy blankie and a mindless movie.  On the days where my head was clear enough I did work on deadlines and do a bit of research.

Which brings us to Friday.  The first day in 5 that I was feeling good.  I took my laptop out on the back porch, sat with some tea and cruised the Find My Past website.

It hit me earlier that week that I had not done any personal family history research in months.  MONTHS!  I have been writing, lecturing and doing client work but really have not had any time to do anything on my or my husband’s trees.  Well, now that I was feeling better that was going to change.  I gave myself the weekend to play and have fun.

In the past I have found some really great items there for my husband’s family in Somerset.  Plus I discovered some great newspaper articles for my father’s family from his hometown.  This time, however, I was going to try a new feature.  Well a new to me feature, their family tree feature.

You can upload a tree or start from fresh and using their new hints (it is still in Beta) feature it will
show you matches from their documents and databases.  Yeah, I know, they and every other company have this ability.  I do try them all though hoping that one day I will find one that I love.  So, seeing as this is new, with a Beta version of some features, I was up for trying a new one and seeing where it could lead me.  What’s the worst that could happen? It should be fun!  Right?!

Yes, I did upload a tree.  Yes, I have a lazy streak in me.  Well, honestly I wanted to see how easy it would be.  I have the worst luck with uploading files.  I was pleasantly pleased that it went without a hitch and I had literally hundreds of viable hints with a few minutes.  So many hints, to real DOCUMENTS, that I deleted my tree.  Don’t freak on me.  It was just a tree.

Well, I thought to myself, if I can get that many so quickly why don’t I start with myself and then start building out like, well, you are supposed to do.  I wanted to see where these documents lead me.  That thought then lead me to the decision where I sat down on Saturday and just went for it.  It wasn’t until I entered our parents in the tree that I started to get any hints.  It surprised me, really, but made me a little happy that no hints popped up for the hubs or me.  Within 30 minutes I was 4 generations back on my father’s line with census, marriage, birth and death records.  Yeah, I couldn’t believe how fast it was going.

Then the whiskey came out.  Yes, genealogy research really is heightened by a good glass of whiskey.  Okay, it also helped with the cough and aches.

I only have a couple critiques.  I prefer a sideways pedigree chart and only a top to bottom pedigree chart when I am looking at a specific family.  Unfortunately the top down pedigree chart seems to be the default setting in the family tree page. I had to keep clicking back over to the “pedigree view” from the “family view” each time I finished looking at a document.


Also, the house icon with my family tree title does not take you to the home person for the tree like I thought it would.  From the hints page (or the person you are looking at page) it take you back to the family view for that person.  You have to re-navigate back down to the home person. 

While it shouldn’t be a big deal, it was annoying.  These things are still being worked through obviously so hopefully they will come along in future versions.  Unless I am completely missing the boat then hopefully someone will point this out to me!

So yeah, a productive weekend to say the least.  With summer just starting and the kids getting out of school I think we will have some fun genealogy lessons using Find My Past.  It should keep them busy for the next 10 weeks…right?

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

2 Live streaming opportunities from SCGS Jamboree 15

As much as I would love to be on a plane to Southern California this week for Jamboree it is just not in the cards for me.  However I, and you at home, can participate from afar in this great conference.  With the sponsorship of Ancestry.com the Southern California Genealogical Society is presenting 3 days of live streaming videos.  The best part, it’s free.

Yeah, I said free!  Just go out and register to use the site.  After that check out the live streaming page for the listing of presentation from Friday – Sunday you can watch from your couch.  I know we all have busy lives and schedules, but you might be able to squeeze in an hour or two to learn something new.

However, if you are interested in genetic genealogy don’t forget that Thursday June 4th is the all-day DNA Day.  You can register for the 6 sessions for $99 or individual sessions at $20 each.  If you are interested in learning more about genetic genealogy this is something you should check out.

Below is the live streaming schedule for the free sessions.  Bet you can find something you like!


Friday June 5 Broadcast Schedule
(all times are Pacific Daylight Time (GMT -7:00)

Denise May Levenick
FR007
Be Prepared with a Genealogy Disaster Plan
1:00 PM - 2:00PM PDT
Is your genealogy safe? Fire, flood, or power loss can destroy a lifetime of research and heirlooms. Practical ideas to protect your work and salvage items damaged by water or smoke. Denise Levenick, aka The Family Curator, is an author and genealogist with a special interest in organizing and preserving family collections. She is the creator of the award-winning website www.TheFamilyCurator.com, author of two books, How to Archive Family Keepsakes and How to Archive Family Photos,lecturer, and frequent magazine contributor. Genealogy experience level: Newbie, Beginner, Advanced Beginner, Intermediate

Ancestry.com
* Finding Your Ancestor’s Story in the Records
* Five Things You Should Do With Every Record
* Down on the Farm
Your Civil War Ancestors in Historical Perspective
2:00 PM - 2:30 PM PDT
These pre-recorded videos brought to you by Ancestry.com

J. H."Jay" Fonkert, CG
FR018
Five Tips for Successful Research in a New Location
2:30 PM - 3:30 PM PDT
When tackling a new locale, get to know the geography, the local history, the record-keeping jurisdictions, the range of available records, and the researchers who know their way around town. Gen1, Gen2. J. H. (“Jay”) Fonkert, CG(sm) is a director of APG, a trustee of the BCG Education Fund, and a past president of the Minnesota Genealogical Society. He has published more than 30 research and teaching articles in Minnesota GenealogistThe SeptsFamily ChronicleNGS Magazine and the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, and has spoken at society meetings and major conferences in eight states and provinces. Genealogy experience level: Newbie, Beginner, Advanced Beginner

Ancestry.com
Questions to Ask Living Relatives
3:30 PM - 4:00 PM PDT
This pre-recorded video brought to you by Ancestry.com

Blaine T. Bettinger, PhD, JD and Paul Woodbury
FR019
Genetic Genealogy and the Next Generation
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM PDT
This session provides and introduction to genetic genealogy for youth and the role that DNA will play in the future of family history. Blaine T. Bettinger, PhD, JD, is an intellectual property attorney at Bond, Schoeneck and King in Syracuse, NY. Dr. Bettinger is the author of The Genetic Genealogist, a blog that examines the intersections of traditional genealogical techniques and modern genetic research since 2007. Paul Woodbury is a recent graduate of Brigham Young University where he studied Genetics and Family History. He has been involved in family history research for 15 years. Currently he works as a client researcher and private contractor in conjunction with The DNA Detectives. He specializes in French, Spanish, Scandinavian and genetic genealogy. Genealogy experience level: Newbie, Beginner

Ancestry.com
* Should I Take That Hint?
* Finding Irish Origins

* Find the Parents
* Five Things You Should Do With Every Record
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM PDT
These pre-recorded videos brought to you by Ancestry.com

Dr. Michael D. Lacopo
FR032
Finding and Utilizing German Church Records
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM PDT
Many of us have German-speaking European ancestors but are afraid to tackle the next steps across the Atlantic. Your lecturer will show examples of German church records, how to decipher them and how to overcome the fear of German script. Dr. Michael D. Lacopo is a retired small-animal veterinarian born and raised in Northern Indiana. He takes a scientific approach to his research as he does to his profession. Researching since 1980, he has lectured internationally and written for numerous periodicals and journals. A self-described "all-American mutt," his research skills cover a broad range. Michael is author of the popular HoosierDaddy Blog at http://roots4u.blogspot.com. Genealogy experience level: Beginner, Advanced Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced


Saturday June 6 Broadcast Schedule
(all times are Pacific Daylight Time (GMT -7:00)

Lisa Louise Cooke
SA007
Google Tools and Procedures for Solving Family History Mysteries
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM PDT
In this session we will put Google to the test. Discover Google tools and the process for using them to solve the genealogical challenges you face. You'll walk away with exciting new techniques you can use right away. Louise Cooke is the founder of Genealogy Gems, a genealogy and family history multi-media company. She is the producer of the Genealogy Gems Podcast, the popular online genealogy audio show, downloaded over 1.5 million times, available at GenealogyGems.com & iTunes. She produces The Family Tree Magazine Podcast, writes for the magazine and is the author of four popular books. Genealogy experience level: Intermediate

Ancestry.com
* Finding the Stories of Moms in Your Family Tree
* Start Small, Go Big – How Sliders Can Help Your Searching

* Clues from the Graveyard
* Finding Your Ancestor’s Story in the Records
9:30 AM - 10:00 AM PDT
These pre-recorded videos brought to you by Ancestry.com

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA
SA014
Tho' They Were Poor, They May Have Been Rich in Records
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PDT
No land, no probate, or no money? No problem. Rich records exist of poor ancestors or those with temporary problems. Details include place of origin, date of birth, religion, residence, infirmity, death date, burial, family, and adoption details. Paula Stuart Warren, CG, FUGA, FMGS, works full-time in genealogical and historical research, lecturing, consulting, & writing. She is a Course Coordinator for SLIG & GRIP, is on the board of FGS, former officer of APG & former board member of the Minnesota Genealogical Society. Her articles & lectures focus on unusual resources, manuscripts, methodology, analysis, repositories, & Native Americans. Genealogy experience level: Advanced Beginner, Intermediate

Ancestry.com
Smarter Searching: Look for Records Not People
11:00 AM - 11:30 AM PDT
This pre-recorded video brought to you by Ancestry.com

Lisa A. Alzo, MFA
SA021
No Easy Button: Using Immersion Genealogy to Understand Your Ancestors
11:30 AM - 12:30 PM PDT
Learn how to take your research a step further to understand your ancestors' lives through "immersion genealogy"--the process of discovering where they lived, worked, and worshipped, and much more. Lisa A. Alzo, M.F.A., is a freelance writer, instructor, and internationally recognized lecturer, specializing in Slovak/Eastern European genealogical research, writing your family history, and using the internet to trace female and immigrant ancestors. She is the author of nine books and hundreds of magazine articles. Genealogy experience level: Newbie, Beginner, Advanced Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Professional, Communicator

Ancestry.com
* AncestryDNA: New Ancestors Discoveries Reviewed
* Using Ancestry.com Like A Pro

1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PDT
These pre-recorded videos brought to you by Ancestry.com

Cyndi Ingle
SA033
Plotting, Scheming and Mapping Online
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM PDT
The Internet is a source for a variety of maps and geographical tools that will help you in your research. From new maps and atlases with online driving directions to old gazetteers with county lines and ancient place names, the Internet has them all. We'll explore those resources, ideas for using them and integrating them into your research routine. Cyndi Ingle, a genealogist for more than 34 years, is the creator of Cyndi's List; author of three books for genealogical research on the Internet; a past-member of the board of directors for the National Genealogical Society and active member in several other Genealogical groups. Genealogy experience level: Newbie, Beginner, Advanced Beginner, Intermediate 

Ancestry.com
Your Migration Story
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM PDT
This pre-recorded video brought to you by Ancestry.com

Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA
SA035
Midwestern and Plains States Level Census Records
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM PDT
Learn about the indexes, varied extensive personal details included, locating the censuses and alternate sources. Provides an overview for IL, IN, IA, KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, OH, SD, and WI. Some are drool-worthy! Paula Stuart Warren, CG, FUGA, FMGS works full-time in genealogical and historical research, lecturing, consulting, & writing. She is a Course Coordinator for SLIG & GRIP, is on the board of FGS, former officer of APG & former board member of the Minnesota Genealogical Society. Her articles & lectures focus on unusual resources, manuscripts, methodology, analysis, repositories, & Native Americans. Genealogy experience level: Beginner, Advanced Beginner, Advanced

Ancestry.com
* Finding Your Ancestor’s Story in the Records
* Five Things You Should Do With Every Record
Down on the Farm
Your Civil War Ancestors in Historical Perspective
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM PDT
These pre-recorded videos brought to you by Ancestry.com


Lisa Louise Cooke
SA047
Update: Google! Everything New that You Need to Know for Genealogy
5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
One thing guaranteed about working online is that everything is subject to change! Get the scoop on all the latest changes you need to know about for effective genealogy searching. Lisa Louise Cooke is the founder of Genealogy Gems, a genealogy and family history multi-media company. She is the producer of the Genealogy Gems Podcast, the popular online genealogy audio show, downloaded over 1.5 million times, available at GenealogyGems.com & iTunes. She produces The Family Tree Magazine Podcast, writes for the magazine and is the author of four popular books. Genealogy experience level: Intermediate


Sunday June 7 Broadcast Schedule
(all times are Pacific Daylight Time (GMT -7:00)

Janet Hovorka, MLIS
SU005
Family History Adhesive: Science and Simple Tech 4 Binding Families
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM PDT
Studies show that family history strengthens your relationships and empowers your current family. Use the technology your family already accesses every day to create a strong narrative together. Janet Hovorka owns Family ChartMasters, an award-winning genealogy chart printing service and is the author of theZap the Grandma Gap book and workbooks about engaging youth with family history. Janet writes The Chart Chick and theZap The Grandma Gap blogs and has widely written and lectured about family history. She is a past president of UGA and teaches genealogy and library science at SLCC. Genealogy experience level: Newbie, Beginner, Advanced Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Ancestry.com
* Should I Take That Hint?
* Finding Irish Origins

* Find the Parents
* Five Things You Should Do With Every Record
9:30 AM - 10:00 AM PDT
These pre-recorded videos brought to you by Ancestry.com

Cyndi Ingle
SU015
The Hidden Web: Digging Deeper
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PDT
When Google and traditional search engines don't return useful information, don't stop there. We will explore resources that are invisible to Google and hidden deep within web sites and proprietary databases. The "hidden web" lies buried within the collections for commercial web sites, libraries, archives, and museums. We will also talk about the importance of indexes that deep-link into web sites online, thus uncovering hidden gems of information that may not be found easily through a search engine query. Cyndi Ingle, a genealogist for more than 34 years, is the creator of Cyndi's List; author of three books for genealogical research on the Internet; a past member of the board of directors for the National Genealogical Society and active member in several other genealogical groups. Genealogy experience level: Newbie, Beginner, Advanced Beginner, Intermediate

Ancestry.com
* Introduction to Fold3
* Find A Grave: Linking Families
* Life Events: Telling the Stories of Their Lives

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM PDT
These pre-recorded videos brought to you by Ancestry.com

Anita Paul
SU022
Who, What, When, Where? Using Journalism Techniques to Write Your Story
1:00 PM - 2:00 PM PDT
Journalists get to the point with their writing. Learn proven techniques to do the same when writing your family's genealogy story. Anita R. Paul, the Author's Midwife, helps researchers, professionals, and entrepreneurs enhance their expertise, position their platform and build their brand by becoming a published author. Through her Write Your Life program, authors overcome the struggles of writing, publishing, and marketing a book, so they can leverage the book for success. Genealogy experience level: Intermediate, Advanced, Professional, Communicator

Ancestry.com
* Finding the Stories of Moms in Your Family Tree
* Start Small, Go Big – How Sliders Can Help Your Searching

* Clues from the Graveyard
* Finding Your Ancestor’s Story in the Records
2:00 PM - 2:30 PM PDT
This pre-recorded video brought to you by Ancestry.com

Matthew Hovorka
SU030
Get to Know Your Geezers
2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Start visiting the top sites used by professionals. Collect your family history using Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org and MyHeritage.com and learn the differences between sources and conclusion trees. Gen1, Youth, Technology. Matthew Hovorka was only 4 years old when his parents started Family ChartMasters thus enveloping his life in family history. He's currently 16 years old and has been working on correctly sourcing his ancestor's research. When he isn't doing genealogy he can be found doing something else on the computer. Genealogy experience level: Newbie, Beginner


Monday, May 18, 2015

NGS Day 4 Recap

The last day of NGS was packed.  Last days usually are frantic, energy filled whirling dervishes and this one was no different.

Most of the day was spent in the exhibit hall or corridors talking to friends (old and new) mainly saying our goodbyes or until we meet agains.  That is the bittersweet part.  Sure, many of us converse frequently through email or social media but, honestly, it’s not the same as seeing someone in the flesh.  Goodbyes are hard, I really hate them and many times I wish I could carry my genea-buds around in my pocket.  Oh wait, I do!  It’s called a smart phone!

Of course it took me until day 3 to eat at the food trucks.  Yes, there were food trucks at the conference and I have to say the Mexican one was quite good.  Nomnomnom for the pork mole tacos with mango salsa I ate.  It was so good!

The one lecture I stole myself away to was Michael Ramage’s “Adoption Research for Genealogists and Real Life Case Study.”  I even set an alarm so I wouldn’t get talking and miss it.  Currently I am working on an adoption mystery in my own family plus I have many friends who are adopted and ask me for guidance.  I do what I can to help with the paper genealogy, and now DNA, but at times I still feel like I struggle.  It’s that lost feeling of “is there more I could be doing but don’t know that I can” which the hardest to deal with.  I did pick up some great tips from Ramage and also received validation through the lecture that I am doing it all correct.

Then there was the announcement that everyone who was tweeting could hardly wait for: who would be the winner of the twitter contest and receive a full registration for NGS 2016 in Ft. Lauderdale.  Let me set this scene for you. About 1:30pm I was sitting talking with some friends in the exhibit hall when my cell phone vibrates.  Even though it happens all the time I actually took a moment to look, and that is when I saw the announcement from NGS that I had won.  Well, I jumped up, squealed like I do when excited and showed the message to my friends.  Holey Moley!  My husband was very excited too.  That’s one less thing we have to worry about budgeting for next year.

It was also announced on Saturday that NGS 2017 will be in Raleigh, North Carolina.  That made me very happy too.  Not only do I have to plan to be there a few days before so I can research but it is an easy drive for me from where I live.  Well, easy as long as I-95 doesn’t decide to become the parking lot it likes to be frequently. 

My evening was topped off with about 20 blogging friends for the informal NGS blogger dinner.  We went to a great BBQ place in St. Charles and sat outside on the deck.  At times it looked like it was snowing with the cottonwood floating around.  It was the perfect setting to end my time on the banks of the Missouri.  Good food + great friends = an amazing evening


Later this week after I have a chance to unpack, do laundry and catch up on work I will post more on my overall thoughts about the conference.  There are a few things that are percolating in the brain which I think I need to write down.

Friday, May 15, 2015

NGS Day 3 Recap


Lewis and Clark Memorial

Today was silly day.  If you saw me in the exhibit hall or even the hallways I was a, well, bundle of energy.  All I can say is what you may have witnessed is my state right before I fall over and go boom.  Yes, the lack of sleep and too much caffeine is catching up to me! 

I am working at the In-Depth Genealogist booth for NGS.  If you have never volunteered or had a booth at a conference you should consider it at some point.  Yes, it is a ton of work.  However it is also an amazing time.  I have meet a wide variety of people, shared stories, made friends, been goofy and even had a few very serious conversations.  Working a booth gives you great insight into who is attending the conference and why.  If you are a people watcher there is nothing like it.

Then there is doing yoga behind the table, ask me about it, dare you.

Today I was lucky enough to attend 3 lectures.  Elizabeth Shown Mills “The Problem Solver’s Trifecta: GPS + FAN + DNA,” Michael S. Ramage “Forensic Genealogy Meets the Genealogical Proof Standard,” and Angie Bush “Using DNA as a Genealogical Record.”  Yes, I got my geek on for a few hours today. 

Many of you know that I write, lecture and study DNA passionately.  Which, of course, meant that I had to attend these lectures.  While I knew the subjects I found the case studies interesting.  It was a great way to show those who are not familiar with the subject how DNA and forensic techniques are relevant to the genealogy field.  It would be great if more and more people became experts in these fields over the next few years.  There is more than enough work to go around!

This evening I was happy to have no firm plans.  I was able to walk along the Missouri River with my roommates and have an amazing dinner at a little dinner on Main Street in Historic Downtown St.
Charles.  It threatened to rain several times but just having a bit of decompression time to read historical plaques and explore was fantastic.

Tomorrow is the last day of the conference.  I am sad to see the end, but also happy to be heading home soon to the family.  So, until tomorrow, I hope you have sweet dreams about ancestors to be discovered! 




Thursday, May 14, 2015

NGS 2015 Day 2 Recap


Today was a long and tiring but oh so exciting in many ways.  Not just for me either. My poor 19 year old roomie was appalled when her mother and I got her up at 6 am (we were up at 5 by the way) to head for breakfast.

I was excited to start my day at the Find My Past breakfast.  As usual the members of the community that were there were diverse.  Bloggers, lecturers, younger and older genealogists all gathered for comradery and to meet someone new.  I sat with a great group of people and made a few new friends. 
Of course we got a glimpse into some of the up and coming things at Find My Past.  I admit that many made me excited, and many more reminded me that once again it is a site I need to investigate more regularly.  They are always adding something new (new record Friday!?) and I encourage you to go and look too.  Also, many people are interested to see how the merger with Mocavo is going.  From the booth presence (which if you are here you need to go check out) I can tell that it is business as normal with them.  A fact that I am thankful for since it was a great endeavor on its own!
I was disappointed that I did not get to attend a lecture by Karen Maurer Jones titled “Records Created by New York Towns and Cities: Uncommonly Rich Resources.”  While I showed up 15 minutes early there was not a seat open and per the fire marshal people were not allowed to stand.  Yeah, I was so sad to miss it, but it’s a lesson to all that you never know how fast a class will fill up.

On the flip side I did attend “Building Better Citations” by Alison Hare.  Yes, I know, I teach people how to make good source citations.  However, like I have said several times in the past few days, you never know when you will learn a new idea or technique.  She had some great points and other ways of explaining what could be a very dry topic.  I also have to admit that it was nice to know that the way I think about citations is an accepted way.  My head was nodding frequently in agreement with what she said.  Citations are very much layers and once you understand the layering process it will fall into place.

After sessions were over this evening I was able to join in on the NextGen Genealogy Network meet-Its great fun to get together with younger genealogists (and those who support us) to learn, vent and network.  Dinner, however, afterwards with the Chicago Genealogical Society (roommates and ride home were in attendance!) was the topping on the cake.  Yummy time at the Trailhead Brewing Company in historic downtown St. Charles, MO.
n-greet.


Tomorrow is Friday.  Friday!! I have a couple classes I am really looking forward to tomorrow.  Fingers crossed that I get a seat in those rooms.